urbangeographies:

Frontier urbanization in the Amazon Basin
The rapidly urbanizing countries of the Global South – Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East – now face huge challenges in providing services and infrastructures in fast-growing cities. The Amazon region of Brazil, for example, now experiences the country’s fastest rates of population growth, both through high birth rates and in-migration. While the large regional metropolises of Manaus and Belém each approach populations of two million, the most spectacular rates of urban growth lie in the inland boomtowns, where natural resources lure migrants. 
Since the 1960s, construction of roads and airstrips has encouraged farming, cattle ranching, timber extraction, mining, soy production, and hydroelectric dams. Because lands are quickly consolidated into large holdings, many migrants accumulate in boomtowns. By the 1980s most of the Amazon’s growing population lived in cities, although the categories of “rural” and “urban” have been somewhat fluid, as migrants rotate between economic sectors. Unfortunately tropical forests have been steadily removed in areas of greatest in-migration. The images above show (from top to bottom):
peripheral communities of metropolitan Belém and Manaus;
regional growth poles of Marabá and Parauapebas, each with about a quarter of a million inhabitants, located in southeastern Pará state;
frontier urbanization in Assis Brasil, located in western Acre state, where the new Interoceanic Highway crosses from Brazil into Peru. While still a small city of about 5,000, prospects for growth in this new boomtown are good, as international commerce grows.
For more on such urban and regional issues, see Urban Geographies: Cities of People, Places, and Projects.
urbangeographies:

Frontier urbanization in the Amazon Basin
The rapidly urbanizing countries of the Global South – Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East – now face huge challenges in providing services and infrastructures in fast-growing cities. The Amazon region of Brazil, for example, now experiences the country’s fastest rates of population growth, both through high birth rates and in-migration. While the large regional metropolises of Manaus and Belém each approach populations of two million, the most spectacular rates of urban growth lie in the inland boomtowns, where natural resources lure migrants. 
Since the 1960s, construction of roads and airstrips has encouraged farming, cattle ranching, timber extraction, mining, soy production, and hydroelectric dams. Because lands are quickly consolidated into large holdings, many migrants accumulate in boomtowns. By the 1980s most of the Amazon’s growing population lived in cities, although the categories of “rural” and “urban” have been somewhat fluid, as migrants rotate between economic sectors. Unfortunately tropical forests have been steadily removed in areas of greatest in-migration. The images above show (from top to bottom):
peripheral communities of metropolitan Belém and Manaus;
regional growth poles of Marabá and Parauapebas, each with about a quarter of a million inhabitants, located in southeastern Pará state;
frontier urbanization in Assis Brasil, located in western Acre state, where the new Interoceanic Highway crosses from Brazil into Peru. While still a small city of about 5,000, prospects for growth in this new boomtown are good, as international commerce grows.
For more on such urban and regional issues, see Urban Geographies: Cities of People, Places, and Projects.
urbangeographies:

Frontier urbanization in the Amazon Basin
The rapidly urbanizing countries of the Global South – Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East – now face huge challenges in providing services and infrastructures in fast-growing cities. The Amazon region of Brazil, for example, now experiences the country’s fastest rates of population growth, both through high birth rates and in-migration. While the large regional metropolises of Manaus and Belém each approach populations of two million, the most spectacular rates of urban growth lie in the inland boomtowns, where natural resources lure migrants. 
Since the 1960s, construction of roads and airstrips has encouraged farming, cattle ranching, timber extraction, mining, soy production, and hydroelectric dams. Because lands are quickly consolidated into large holdings, many migrants accumulate in boomtowns. By the 1980s most of the Amazon’s growing population lived in cities, although the categories of “rural” and “urban” have been somewhat fluid, as migrants rotate between economic sectors. Unfortunately tropical forests have been steadily removed in areas of greatest in-migration. The images above show (from top to bottom):
peripheral communities of metropolitan Belém and Manaus;
regional growth poles of Marabá and Parauapebas, each with about a quarter of a million inhabitants, located in southeastern Pará state;
frontier urbanization in Assis Brasil, located in western Acre state, where the new Interoceanic Highway crosses from Brazil into Peru. While still a small city of about 5,000, prospects for growth in this new boomtown are good, as international commerce grows.
For more on such urban and regional issues, see Urban Geographies: Cities of People, Places, and Projects.
urbangeographies:

Frontier urbanization in the Amazon Basin
The rapidly urbanizing countries of the Global South – Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East – now face huge challenges in providing services and infrastructures in fast-growing cities. The Amazon region of Brazil, for example, now experiences the country’s fastest rates of population growth, both through high birth rates and in-migration. While the large regional metropolises of Manaus and Belém each approach populations of two million, the most spectacular rates of urban growth lie in the inland boomtowns, where natural resources lure migrants. 
Since the 1960s, construction of roads and airstrips has encouraged farming, cattle ranching, timber extraction, mining, soy production, and hydroelectric dams. Because lands are quickly consolidated into large holdings, many migrants accumulate in boomtowns. By the 1980s most of the Amazon’s growing population lived in cities, although the categories of “rural” and “urban” have been somewhat fluid, as migrants rotate between economic sectors. Unfortunately tropical forests have been steadily removed in areas of greatest in-migration. The images above show (from top to bottom):
peripheral communities of metropolitan Belém and Manaus;
regional growth poles of Marabá and Parauapebas, each with about a quarter of a million inhabitants, located in southeastern Pará state;
frontier urbanization in Assis Brasil, located in western Acre state, where the new Interoceanic Highway crosses from Brazil into Peru. While still a small city of about 5,000, prospects for growth in this new boomtown are good, as international commerce grows.
For more on such urban and regional issues, see Urban Geographies: Cities of People, Places, and Projects.
urbangeographies:

Frontier urbanization in the Amazon Basin
The rapidly urbanizing countries of the Global South – Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East – now face huge challenges in providing services and infrastructures in fast-growing cities. The Amazon region of Brazil, for example, now experiences the country’s fastest rates of population growth, both through high birth rates and in-migration. While the large regional metropolises of Manaus and Belém each approach populations of two million, the most spectacular rates of urban growth lie in the inland boomtowns, where natural resources lure migrants. 
Since the 1960s, construction of roads and airstrips has encouraged farming, cattle ranching, timber extraction, mining, soy production, and hydroelectric dams. Because lands are quickly consolidated into large holdings, many migrants accumulate in boomtowns. By the 1980s most of the Amazon’s growing population lived in cities, although the categories of “rural” and “urban” have been somewhat fluid, as migrants rotate between economic sectors. Unfortunately tropical forests have been steadily removed in areas of greatest in-migration. The images above show (from top to bottom):
peripheral communities of metropolitan Belém and Manaus;
regional growth poles of Marabá and Parauapebas, each with about a quarter of a million inhabitants, located in southeastern Pará state;
frontier urbanization in Assis Brasil, located in western Acre state, where the new Interoceanic Highway crosses from Brazil into Peru. While still a small city of about 5,000, prospects for growth in this new boomtown are good, as international commerce grows.
For more on such urban and regional issues, see Urban Geographies: Cities of People, Places, and Projects.
urbangeographies:

Frontier urbanization in the Amazon Basin
The rapidly urbanizing countries of the Global South – Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East – now face huge challenges in providing services and infrastructures in fast-growing cities. The Amazon region of Brazil, for example, now experiences the country’s fastest rates of population growth, both through high birth rates and in-migration. While the large regional metropolises of Manaus and Belém each approach populations of two million, the most spectacular rates of urban growth lie in the inland boomtowns, where natural resources lure migrants. 
Since the 1960s, construction of roads and airstrips has encouraged farming, cattle ranching, timber extraction, mining, soy production, and hydroelectric dams. Because lands are quickly consolidated into large holdings, many migrants accumulate in boomtowns. By the 1980s most of the Amazon’s growing population lived in cities, although the categories of “rural” and “urban” have been somewhat fluid, as migrants rotate between economic sectors. Unfortunately tropical forests have been steadily removed in areas of greatest in-migration. The images above show (from top to bottom):
peripheral communities of metropolitan Belém and Manaus;
regional growth poles of Marabá and Parauapebas, each with about a quarter of a million inhabitants, located in southeastern Pará state;
frontier urbanization in Assis Brasil, located in western Acre state, where the new Interoceanic Highway crosses from Brazil into Peru. While still a small city of about 5,000, prospects for growth in this new boomtown are good, as international commerce grows.
For more on such urban and regional issues, see Urban Geographies: Cities of People, Places, and Projects.
urbangeographies:

Frontier urbanization in the Amazon Basin
The rapidly urbanizing countries of the Global South – Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East – now face huge challenges in providing services and infrastructures in fast-growing cities. The Amazon region of Brazil, for example, now experiences the country’s fastest rates of population growth, both through high birth rates and in-migration. While the large regional metropolises of Manaus and Belém each approach populations of two million, the most spectacular rates of urban growth lie in the inland boomtowns, where natural resources lure migrants. 
Since the 1960s, construction of roads and airstrips has encouraged farming, cattle ranching, timber extraction, mining, soy production, and hydroelectric dams. Because lands are quickly consolidated into large holdings, many migrants accumulate in boomtowns. By the 1980s most of the Amazon’s growing population lived in cities, although the categories of “rural” and “urban” have been somewhat fluid, as migrants rotate between economic sectors. Unfortunately tropical forests have been steadily removed in areas of greatest in-migration. The images above show (from top to bottom):
peripheral communities of metropolitan Belém and Manaus;
regional growth poles of Marabá and Parauapebas, each with about a quarter of a million inhabitants, located in southeastern Pará state;
frontier urbanization in Assis Brasil, located in western Acre state, where the new Interoceanic Highway crosses from Brazil into Peru. While still a small city of about 5,000, prospects for growth in this new boomtown are good, as international commerce grows.
For more on such urban and regional issues, see Urban Geographies: Cities of People, Places, and Projects.
urbangeographies:

Frontier urbanization in the Amazon Basin
The rapidly urbanizing countries of the Global South – Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East – now face huge challenges in providing services and infrastructures in fast-growing cities. The Amazon region of Brazil, for example, now experiences the country’s fastest rates of population growth, both through high birth rates and in-migration. While the large regional metropolises of Manaus and Belém each approach populations of two million, the most spectacular rates of urban growth lie in the inland boomtowns, where natural resources lure migrants. 
Since the 1960s, construction of roads and airstrips has encouraged farming, cattle ranching, timber extraction, mining, soy production, and hydroelectric dams. Because lands are quickly consolidated into large holdings, many migrants accumulate in boomtowns. By the 1980s most of the Amazon’s growing population lived in cities, although the categories of “rural” and “urban” have been somewhat fluid, as migrants rotate between economic sectors. Unfortunately tropical forests have been steadily removed in areas of greatest in-migration. The images above show (from top to bottom):
peripheral communities of metropolitan Belém and Manaus;
regional growth poles of Marabá and Parauapebas, each with about a quarter of a million inhabitants, located in southeastern Pará state;
frontier urbanization in Assis Brasil, located in western Acre state, where the new Interoceanic Highway crosses from Brazil into Peru. While still a small city of about 5,000, prospects for growth in this new boomtown are good, as international commerce grows.
For more on such urban and regional issues, see Urban Geographies: Cities of People, Places, and Projects.

urbangeographies:

Frontier urbanization in the Amazon Basin

The rapidly urbanizing countries of the Global South – Africa, Asia, Latin America, and the Middle East – now face huge challenges in providing services and infrastructures in fast-growing cities. The Amazon region of Brazil, for example, now experiences the country’s fastest rates of population growth, both through high birth rates and in-migration. While the large regional metropolises of Manaus and Belém each approach populations of two million, the most spectacular rates of urban growth lie in the inland boomtowns, where natural resources lure migrants. 

Since the 1960s, construction of roads and airstrips has encouraged farming, cattle ranching, timber extraction, mining, soy production, and hydroelectric dams. Because lands are quickly consolidated into large holdings, many migrants accumulate in boomtowns. By the 1980s most of the Amazon’s growing population lived in cities, although the categories of “rural” and “urban” have been somewhat fluid, as migrants rotate between economic sectors. Unfortunately tropical forests have been steadily removed in areas of greatest in-migration. The images above show (from top to bottom):

  • peripheral communities of metropolitan Belém and Manaus;
  • regional growth poles of Marabá and Parauapebas, each with about a quarter of a million inhabitants, located in southeastern Pará state;
  • frontier urbanization in Assis Brasil, located in western Acre state, where the new Interoceanic Highway crosses from Brazil into Peru. While still a small city of about 5,000, prospects for growth in this new boomtown are good, as international commerce grows.

For more on such urban and regional issues, see Urban Geographies: Cities of People, Places, and Projects.

Praia de Iracema by comunicaextend on Flickr.Localizada no centro da orla de Fortaleza e famosa por ser predileta do poetas e intelectuais, a praia de Iracema retrata a boemia da cidade. A arquitetura local possui obras preservadas pelo Estado e Município. Recentemente, a praia ganhou um calçadão iluminado propiciando uma boa caminhada até a Ponte dos Ingleses. Praia reta, limitada por quebra-mares, com ondas fortes, recifes e areia grossa e escura. Fortaleza (CE). Foto: Christian Knepper

Praia de Iracema by comunicaextend on Flickr.

Localizada no centro da orla de Fortaleza e famosa por ser predileta do poetas e intelectuais, a praia de Iracema retrata a boemia da cidade. A arquitetura local possui obras preservadas pelo Estado e Município. Recentemente, a praia ganhou um calçadão iluminado propiciando uma boa caminhada até a Ponte dos Ingleses. Praia reta, limitada por quebra-mares, com ondas fortes, recifes e areia grossa e escura. Fortaleza (CE). Foto: Christian Knepper